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markone_8

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  1. I don't think that is correct. One SpR holds one NTN regardless of whether he is pursuing single or dual training. It is the number of NTNs available that determines the number of trainees accepted onto a scheme. Even if a single-CCT SpR later applies for dual training, on acceptance he still keeps the same NTN. Given that there is (or should be) an excess of consultant SpR trainers over the number of SpRs there is scope for the number of SpRs on the scheme to fluctuate.
  2. You should get 6 weeks if you're on the 3rd or higher point of the SpR payscale. Otherwise 5 weeks. See page 48 of the T & C Of Service. Ref http://www.nhsemployers.org/restricted/downloads/download.asp?ref=3700&hash=e75ac8140a906d36a210c7b824c46278&itemplate=e_aboutus_3col_aboutus-2028
  3. Have you been asked by the contestant's GP to provide a diagnosis? If not, why worry about it. If your family 'expects' you to diagnose them then tell them there are proper channels to go down!
  4. I think it always was. Prior to MMC there were one or two deaneries that gave a choice on the SpR application form i.e. tick box for general adult, old age or dual CCT. The others only advertised, and allowed application for, one or the other. I spoke to some of the programme directors before applying and at the time they were adamant that dual would never be possible for me. That was just prior to MMC, whether that was the reason I'm not sure. However I did go on to get accepted onto a dual scheme so as you say it does depend very much on how the deanery (or programme director) interprets the rules. If you look in the HST handbook under dual training it used to be possible to change from single to dual CCT but you'd have to apply for the relevant speciality in open competition with everyone else. Quote: 'Trainees holding an NTN in general psychiatry may not follow a dual training programme and general psychiatry SpR posts cannot be advertised as providing dual training. If trainees wish subsequently to follow a training programme leading to award of a dual CCST, they must apply for a post in the second speciality in open competition. 'SpR posts in old age psychiatry, the psychiatry of learning disability, forensic psychiatry or psychotherapy may be advertised for dual training with general psychiatry. The NTN will be awarded in one of these four named specialities. The appointments committee must include appropriate representation from both specialities. 'Trainees holding an NTN in the four specialities mentioned who are pursuing single CCST training may, during the course of their SpR training, opt to pursue dual training with general psychiatry. They will need to apply and succeed at the next general psychiatry interviews in the deanery, but it will not change their NTN.' Personally I cannot see why future general adult SpRs were 'banned' from pursuing dual training from the outset whereas future old age trainees could apply for dual. What's the difference? If you wish to do dual training and your immediate career intention is general adult you could still apply for the dual scheme and be allocated an old age NTN - it's all academic and you'll get two CCTs.
  5. Hi ECT! This is what I think: 1) I think medical staffing are wrong to pay sessions for ST trainees. I think they have misinterpreted the Terms and Conditions - see my previous post here. http://www.psychclub.com/YaBB.pl?num=1210330268/18#18 If it were me I'd ring them up and argue that I'm not a staff grade so how can I be paid according to the staff grade payscale. Pay protection means your pay remains the same, it doesn't mean you carry on getting paid on the wrong payscale. You are an ST so should be paid on the ST payscale but at a higher rate. That to my mind means your entire pay should be backdated to take into account the 100% banding. 2) I think the situation here is that your rotation began last year in Wrexham Hospital, hence Wrexham is the first hospital on the rotation. This is not good news for claiming excess mileage given that you live in Newport. You could only do this if you were placed further away than Wrexham. The standard mileage rate has recently gone up to 58.3 p per mile so check that's what you're getting (since 1 July). You couldn't claim anything for relocation as, erm, you haven't relocated!
  6. Ask medical staffing if there are 360 feedback forms for consultants, and whether you can use those.
  7. I wonder if this is where the confusion has come from. Extract from Terms and Conditions of Service: 132. Where a practitioner in a career grade takes an appointment in a training grade which is recognised by the appropriate authority as being for the purpose of obtaining approved training (which may include training to enable the practitioner to follow a career in another specialty) and the practitioner has given continuous service in a career grade post or posts for at least 13 months immediately prior to re-entering training, the practitioner shall, while in the training grade, continue to receive a salary protected on the incremental point or threshold the practitioner had reached in his or her previous career grade appointment. Such a practitioner shall receive the benefit of any general pay awards. On reappointment to a career grade post, the practitioner’s starting salary should be assessed as if the period spent in the approved training post had been continuing service in the previous career grade. I wonder if med staffing have interpreted this to mean you continue on your previous incremental point, i.e. get paid as if you were still a staff grade, whereas (perhaps) it's not very well worded and you should be being paid on the ST payscale but at a higher level. Ref http://www.nhsemployers.org/restricted/downloads/download.asp?ref=3700&hash=e75ac8140a906d36a210c7b824c46278&itemplate=e_aboutus_3col_aboutus-2028
  8. Although I haven't read any circulars, I was under the impression that pay protection meant that you are paid on the ST payscale at the paypoint equal to or next highest than the actual salary you received as a staff grade. Then you would also receive an on call (banding) supplement on top. I don't think it means you continue to get paid as if you were a staff grade. I think this is misinterpretation by medical staffing. Certainly in the old system pay protection meant you got bumped up a few levels on the SpR payscale. But as I say I haven't seen any circulars on this.
  9. The rates went up on 1 July. Public transport rate used to be 23 p per mile, now it's 24 p. Standard user rate was 53 p per mile if your vehicle engine is over 1500 cc, now it's 58.3 p per mile. Ref http://www.nhsemployers.org/pay-conditions/pay-conditions-2339.cfm
  10. Check out the Higher Specialist Training Handbook page 21. Given that it's still available on the RCPsych web site it is presumably still applicable to SpRs. Quote: SpR posts in old age psychiatry, the psychiatry of learning disability, forensic psychiatry or psychotherapy may be advertised for dual training with general psychiatry. The NTN will be awarded in one of these four named specialities. The appointments committee must include appropriate representation from both specialities. Trainees holding an NTN in the four specialities mentioned who are pursuing single CCST training may, during the course of their SpR training, opt to pursue dual training with general psychiatry. They will need to apply and succeed at the next general psychiatry interviews in the deanery, but it will not change their NTN. http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/PDF/op43.pdf
  11. Pages 30 - 34.
  12. There's a college report called Postgraduate Training In Psychiatry, sent out recently with the BJP: http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/files/pdfversion/OP65x.pdf http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/publications/collegereports/op/op65.aspx
  13. I'm not sure how helpful that info would be in deciding which rotation to apply for. For instance in the East of England Deanery you could be placed in Luton, Peterborough, Huntingdon, Cambridge, King's Lynn, Bury St Edmonds, Norwich or Great Yarmouth all of which have different rotas. The bandings are in a constant state of flux as discussions go on about who is covering what, so if it were me I would not base a decision on this info, I'd worry about getting an ST4 place at all then worry about that.
  14. I'm an SpR doing old age as part of dual training with general adult. I'm also thinking of doing the DGM. I've obtained some past papers from the Royal College although haven't had a chance to study them yet. It looks like a very worthwhile exam to do, in fact it says it's aimed at doctors including old age psychiatrists. I've also seen several GPs with DGM after their name. The thing for me would be I'd have to practice my physical examinations - I don't get the chance to do them much. There's more info on the web link. Applications for the next round of exams open on 4th August. Ref http://www.rcplondon.ac.uk/education/examinations/Pages/DGM.aspx
  15. Agree. Seem to remember from my medicine days it is 2 - 3 for AF and DVT treatment and 3 - 4.5 for a PE.