Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Elvis

Whatta ya do when....

4 posts in this topic

You feel bamboozled. You know you have everything you need in the one room to pass but you can't even look at a file or a book. Not because you cn't be bothered or are lazy. Far from it, you are raring to go but the volume of stuff is too overwhelming to tackle. Not having a study group has not helped but is unavoidable.

In short I am asking of you this : how do you cope with the nerve angle of part 2. All suggestions gratefully received cos Im all shook up.

Elvis

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some days are just crap and you can't face looking at the books - so have a vodka and take the night off

Personally - to reduce the utter panic of part 2 I extensively quizzed recent SpR's, in order to decide what I would study, otherwise you get swamped by it all.

Then drew up a revision timetable, breaking it down into manageable chunks, and deciding where I would get the information for each bit from.

Before I started to study like this I skimmed through 'the good study guide' by open university books I think (plenty of them cheap on www.amazon.co.uk) - it has great advice about studying and how to write an essay.

Finally, went on the Manchester Course to focus more sharply at the end (actually, I suspect you don't need much more than this if you learn it inside out).

Worked for about 6 months, but only really hard after the course fom 6 weeks before the exam.

Get focussed, break it down:

MCQ's - manchester notes all are recent questions from the exam, so I recognised some.

Critical review - Man. Course notes again superb

Essays - I made a card system for about 10 or so major headings, with about 5-10 refernces which I could throw in.  Also, if you read some guidelines, and national framework documents, you can usually throw some of that in (got it all off this site)

Good luck :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Personally I look at the muppets we work with and think if they can do it ,i can do it!

(maybe I'm just kidding myself !)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Elvis!

I know exactly what you mean! I think it is the sense of things being 'overwhelming' and 'out of control' which can be very disabling?

I've sat (and passed) MRCGP and MRCPsych exams which both have extremely wide syllabuses.

What helped me was to approach it from a different stand point by addressing a few questions e.g.

What do the examiners want to see? I think they want a sensible, safe answer. The GP and Psych exams are both quite good at assessing clinical ability rather than academic excellence, so concentrate on 'real life' revision. This can be alone e.g. ask yourself a possible question, try to answer it, then look up the bits you're stuck on, or to fill it out with detail. Ideally do this with others at work too to see how they answer things. And for MCQs, just do as many practice MCQs as possible!

I managed to see the exam as an opportunity to show that I am a competent Junior psychiatrist rather than a test where they're trying to catch me out. In the clinicals, being confident and friendly and giving the impression that you enjoy seeing patients and discussing difficult clinical challenges will score extra points. Some use visual imagery to help - take ten mins to imagine who the examiners want you to be - a happy, confident doctor with a caring, considerate attitude. You also have to accept that you will make some mistakes, and are open to this, and are willing to correct them.

My best laid plans to study everything failed dramatically, so I ended up picking two books and using these, only refering to other texts when unable to find answers. My books were Puri and Hall Revision Notes in Psychiatry/Complete MCQs in Psychiatry and also the ICD 10.

Structure scores marks. Try to think things through in a structured way, and this will allow you to sound sensible when answering a question you've little idea about or experience of.

I think it is essential to practice PMPs and, to a lesser extent, long cases, prior to the exam too.

Then you can have your Vodka while listening to 'Beginners Luck' by the Great Man himself ;)

The Admiral

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0