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Guest santhana

do we really know how to Pass

11 posts in this topic

hi people

i am just wondering just because I have passed do i really know wot to do to pass

i think the answer is BIG NO

may be i got it this time but had i failed i will be looking for that one bit of special tip that will change my performance

so guys who are taking for the first time have your own framework not all techniques work for everybody and on evry occsassion

my motto keep it broad and simple never get ddrawn into arguements into molecular details of the questions

enjoy the preparation when your time comes you will pass no doubt!!!!!

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i agree. as i said beofre-----luck plays a big part.

hey everyone--start praying!!!

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i agree. as i said beofre-----luck plays a big part.

hey everyone--start praying!!!

i agree wholeheartedly with this

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I fear the enjoyment of preparation for the exam is not a common theme. We all have to admit that exams are an annoying necessity along the numerous hoops we now have to jump through.

While it's not worth getting too stressed about, when you start failiing a few times you begin to doubt your own abilities. You also begin to sence that others look on you as a special case.

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i agree. as i said beofre-----luck plays a big part.

hey everyone--start praying!!!

I disagree with both mcqcrap and johnniespring on this issue .  I have sat the exam a number of times and have finally passed  ::)

Each time I took the exam I passed the clinicals, in fact on one occasion they thought they had made a mistake with the discrepancy  between written and clinical mark .

Turns out that I was not adequately prepared for the written and I admit this now in hindsight  .

I do believe that if you are clinically sound you should be able to cope with  any patient that they throw at you under exam conditons .  A large  part of the exam is about the way you present yourself , how confident you appear , how you  maintain your compousure in the face of stress and exam nerves . How well you are able to assimilate the case scenario and present the  salient features as a differential , aetiology and management plan .

Yes,  some may get patients that are easier to examine but are we not supposed to be experienced doctors ?and  should a difficult interview imply a fail mark when you present to the examiners ?

I firmly believe that a confident  approach to the patient and the problem is more than 50% of the battle won.

the only way to get round the clinical 'luck' situation is practice ,practice ,practice till you can do it asleep

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Interesting thread.

I think there is an element of luck in the exams, but I also think some people take exams, especially the Part II, when they're not really ready. They don't have the broad clinical experience to be able to deal with difficult scenarios and often don't see the bigger picture. Differential diagnoses and management plans may seem exhaustive to the candidate but not to an examiner.

What makes it worse is that many candidates think that success in exams comes from reading books, going to courses, etc and neglect clinical work! This doesn't work for the OSCEs and it doesn't work for the Part II clinicals. I've participated in several revision courses and it's always the same - those who have spent time on the wards, in casualty, etc, are easy to spot and always perform the best.

I also think it's very important to have your clinical assessments reviewed regularly by senior members of the team, so that bad habits and incomplete assessments can be improved. It's easy to go through SHO jobs without really improving your clinical skills. If you read your letters from your first job and compare them to your present job, has there been any improvement?

:o

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I will entirely agree with the webmaster Nothing can replace a good clinical acumen yes the theory can have luck factor but clinical ---- even though some may say the exam centre examiner etc I will agree with gurpal

i can also say that i have never failed my clinicals infact htis time more than mental state exam the physical examination definitely helped me to have a good gronds for dicussion in the DD

Nothing can help you like taking good history, mental state exam and physical if you can use all your patient encounters as long case or PMPs you will be laughing in the real ones

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Clinicals are extremely important.Nothing like good clinical skills.At the same time one should not ignore the theory as well.I think if one is organised and hard working there is no question of failure.Also...a very important thing is your attitude.I found that many SHOs who know much more than me have failed several times.I think the problem is the attitude.If you make up your mind to pass and are determined to do so, nothing can stop you.There is no such thing called 'luck'.As I've said earlier,'The harder you work the luckier you get'. :lol:

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I think more than anything one need to know what the examiners want you to say in the exams. That need not necessarily come from hard work or blind practice. However many cases one may have seen and how good diagnostician one may be in real life situations, unless one knows how to play the act infront of the examiners failure is a sure result and vice versa. One need to fit into the frame and need guided practice rather than anything else. I feel exam is a bluff and a farce.

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Hi all.interesting comments above.I have to say having an appropriate clinical post and a good consultant supervision did me a lot good.i was doing a community post with lot of out patients,first assesments.I also had a wonderful consultant who kept his own exam experience very fresh.Practice was there happening most of the time.

Theory prep is totally another issue.oops its over now

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the luck comes into the written part. the clinical is only partially down to luck. everyone has to deal with difficult/complicated cases in day to day work and so should be able to cope with them in the exam, but in most cases the organiser at each centre will try to pick reliable patients for the exam (ie those who will turn up and talk). examiners all have different styles, and i would guess that some fail more people than others and so theres a bit of luck involved there. a way to prepare for this is to practice clinicals with different people (who have different styles). don't be tempted to just practice with the nice SpR, find the nasty scary consultant who knows all the latest research and ask her/him to examine you....

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