Gloria

Various questions - urgent

4 posts in this topic

Hi All,

I had a few questions about some of the stations:

1- What do we reply to the nurse asking if we can force a blood test on the deluded patient refusing it? Does it come under the MCA?

2- If a minor is presenting with any symptoms whether high risk or not, we are allowed to tell parents, right? As long as patient is below 18 years? And what if it was the step parent?

3- In ERP and systematic desensitization explanations, we should first explain CBT and relaxation techniques in both? And can is there a source for all these therapies including family therapy for schizophrenia?

5- Lastly, can someone post the link of the patient explanation leaflets of the college? I failed to find them.

Hope I get my reply soon.

Thanks in advance.

Edited by Gloria

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Hi Gloria. 

1- This is a very vague scenario. I would say that you should ask the nurse many other questions before you can give advice, e.g., is the patient detained under the MHA or informal, does the patient have the capacity to refuse blood test, is the blood test for a physical illness (e.g. pulmonary embolism) or for a psychiatric illness (e.g., clozapine monitoring). Has there been a best interest meeting to discuss this issue? So I can't give an answer without knowing more information. 

 

2- The answer again is it depends on individual cases, if the patient is 16-17 old, they may have capacity and therefore you can't disclose information to parents if they refused to give consent. However, if there is a strong reason to believe that their safety and or others are at risk, then you follow the usual procedures in disclosure of confidential information as you would do with adults. Step parent or a parent are not very important legally, the important thing is who is the NOK (next of kin), the NOK should be involved. 

 

3- I don't know, sorry. 

 

4- http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/healthadvice/atozindex.aspx

 

Best wishes, 

 

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On 11/20/2016 at 12:21, yasirmhm said:

Hi Gloria. 

1- This is a very vague scenario. I would say that you should ask the nurse many other questions before you can give advice, e.g., is the patient detained under the MHA or informal, does the patient have the capacity to refuse blood test, is the blood test for a physical illness (e.g. pulmonary embolism) or for a psychiatric illness (e.g., clozapine monitoring). Has there been a best interest meeting to discuss this issue? So I can't give an answer without knowing more information. 

 

2- The answer again is it depends on individual cases, if the patient is 16-17 old, they may have capacity and therefore you can't disclose information to parents if they refused to give consent. However, if there is a strong reason to believe that their safety and or others are at risk, then you follow the usual procedures in disclosure of confidential information as you would do with adults. Step parent or a parent are not very important legally, the important thing is who is the NOK (next of kin), the NOK should be involved. 

 

3- I don't know, sorry. 

 

4- http://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/healthadvice/atozindex.aspx

 

Best wishes, 

 

Thank you so much.

In the case of pediatric overdose, if the patient asks that  her parents are not informed about her admission, how should we reply?

 

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It depends on the scenario there is one case where child took overdose due to being sexually abused by the step father of course in that case father is denied of any access to the pt till the case is investigated if there is mother alive she should be informed after informing the pt  ,then there is a case of overdose due to bullying where parents of the child who is a minor needs to be informed and involved in the decision making,then there is overdose due to first episode of psychosis so it depends on the task 

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