Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Guest Akishore

The Baboon comes back!!!

6 posts in this topic

The baboon question was in the part II MCQ yesterday!!

I still do not understand how knowledge about a baboons aggressiveness(or his other habits) helps me be a competent psychiatrist.

Can i invite people to add a list of such silly questions on this site so that in future one can just look up such silly things on this site.

Coz searching for answers in psychology books or asking psychologists is of no use.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

my recall system got jammed. sorry. btw, curious to know how people find isq papers. is it true that 50% of basic science isqs were old ones? somebody said that to me during the break. i didnt get that deja-vu feeling that frequently. am i the odd one out? :-[

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it is certainly possible that 50% were old ones, as some did look kind of familiar - however, even this does not make it possible to answer them, as they are just so abstract

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I for 1 certainly didn't get the deja vu feeling in any of the ISQ papers either. I also tend to agree with the thought that a good number of questions seemed so abstract it wouldn't have made a difference if they were repeats.

Well here's to The RCPsych once again ???

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

for me it was jamais vu !!! how was i to know whether having epilepsy increases the recurrence of fire setting behaviour!

i am told somebody very senior in the college owns a baboon sanctuary somewhere in the world... africa?? hence the baboon questions.

btw, do baboons know psychiatrists have that much interest in their levels of aggression, hierachy etc etc ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh dear, study fatigue is setting in. :( Having seen that there were FOUR questions on baboons in the last exam, decided to have a quick look on the web at baboon behaviour.

'The bond-testing hypothesis suggests that social animals can obtain honest information about the quality of their dyadic relationships by exchanging costly, high-risk signals (Zahavi & Zahavi 1997). We evaluated this hypothesis by investigating whether adult male baboons use intense greeting interactions to test the quality and strength of their social bonds. Intense greetings involve intimate and risky behaviors such as embracing and the diddling of the penis and/or scrotum. Data were collected on a colony of 40 Guinea baboons (Papio papio) at the Brookfield Zoo in Chicago'

Heres to a scrotum diddling question on Wednesday :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0