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doc79

what about your result?

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I have passed , thanks every one and i am wondering about your results?

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I passed!!!!!!

results are on the website go to bottom of home page look for what's new click then it brings you to a page where you'll find the results

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i passed too!!!

now to tackle the clinicals.the only motivation is never to give that clinical paper again

congrats to all

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I passed. Congratulations to everybody who passed.

Any tips about how to prepare for clinicals, PMP effectively?

Guys, what about courses?

Any good ones?

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get hold of mancheter notes on clinicals. very comprehensive and up-to-date.

attending a course yourself helps in a way that you can give it a go and do practice in front of the whole audience  :D if you are that brave. or you get a good idea of who you are competing with by guaging at others level/preparation.

personally, i didnt go to many courses but enrolled myself at last minute to birmingham course. it was ok. but i think testing yourself out in a mock exam is the best way to get the real feel of it. you get to know how you tend to perform under stress and time pressure. so, find out if there's anything in your area.

for PMPs, do first few scenarios on dictaphone/tape recorder and play it back for your own feedback. be honest to yourself. choose what kind of opening statement you want to make for each scenario. you dont want to repeat the same thing for all three PMPs, i guess. think yourself in examiner's shoes. what do you expect from a part 2 candidate who deserves to pass? remember, it's not only about knowledge.

the key to success for both parts of the clinicals is PRACTICE, with strict TIMEKEEPING. form a group with likeminded candidates who help each other with constructive criticism. find examiner consultants if possible and practise with them at least twice. if they are a rare entity, alternative would be nice consultants who are not reluctant to give you an objective feedback. write down whatever they say about your performance. then, work on it. may be a bit hard to swallow at first but thats better than flunking it in the real exam.

very important: DONT practise with new people whom you dont know well/ who can crash your confidence in the last week or two. its critical time. you dont want any psychological warfare on you!

be prepared for the unexpected such as minimally-communicative patient/ patient who walks out half way through the interview etc. my advice for such worst case scenarios would be to practise those situations with your fellow candidates. be simulated patient/ examiner to each other and work out how to tackle them. benefits are twofold. you will find out whats helpful to say or not to say (whatever you say to the examiners, DONT sound like you are putting all the blame onto the patient. its their 'mental sate', not 'them') and you feel somewhat prepared and desensitised, even for the worst.

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Thanks for the good tips mee

Can anyone please tell how to tackle patients who give very little info and those who walk out in the middle.

Thanx in anticipation

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i can only share my own experience. so, it's nowhere near being conclusive or absolutely right.

first thing is to calm yourself down. i'm anxious by nature and that kind of situation really puts me off esp because it's the exam in which we put much time and effort (and money). if it happens in the exam, no alternative but to accept it and make the best use of what you got.

try not to show your annoyed mood to the patient. i know, but.....you still have to continue the info gathering. think of something funny and release your frustration.  then, divert your mind on what could be the reason/ possible dx.

if you cant get a good history by letting the patient go on spontaneously, ask direct questions. in my view, you can mention this in your presentation to the examiners. put it in a way so that they'll understand that you know the basic stuff (not to start by closed questions etc) and that you know when to use direct questions appropriately.

but dont ask the pateint the questions suggesting every diagnosis under the sun. there should be some indicators of what the most likely dx could be. is it anxiety/ paranoia/ voices/ LD ? (dont panic, pure LD cases are not usually given in the exams) then, focus on it. use short and simple questions.

try to be observant of the patient's behaviour in the interview with you no matter how short the time period is. try to see his/her behaviour once left the room if possible. describe it in detail when you present the mental state.

in a patient who gives little info or walks out halfway, current mental state becomes the key in your presentation. your list of DD may be a little longer than it would normally be. if the examiners are happy with the way you handled the difficult situtaion and making the best of the opportunity without blaming the patient, they'll help you out by giving you hints of the actual dx. then, you can contiue the discussion as usual. and..............you should PASS.

hope this is helpful.

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