Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Guest sandra

impending exam results

32 posts in this topic

Hi eveyone,I'm sure that there are many out there feeling just like me ie; anxiety reaching critical mass ,skiing off the slope of the yerkes dodson curve into blind panic..haha!

Its funny but i think I can now appreciate what it must feel like to have GAD or Panic disorder..

Seriously folks I was just wondering wot ideas people have for passing the hrs till monday to alleviate some of the suffering.I dont think I can look at a psychiatry related book without whipping myself into a frenzy.

All suggestions welcome and of course best wishes to everyone on monday :D :D :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I found doing sudoku helped. Heard about it but did not really get into it until a few days before the results came out. Had difficulty concentrating due to anxiety and watching TV / DVDs did not help. My dad left a sudoku book behind and so I thought I'd give it a go. Excellent stuff. Been hooked since. Great way to pass time as it takes between 30 - 45 mins per puzzle if you are not used to doing them. Also gives a great sense of achievement once a puzzle is completed. Good luck to all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

u r right duthcie i will say repression,suppression or total denial is d best strategy for dealing with the situation at this moment to prevent unecassary anxiety.it doesnt matter wether they are immature,neurotic or mature defence mechanism. >:(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I can't deal with my nerves any more. This is real

torture. Eventhough we have faced it during part 1, this waiting never gets easier

ALL THE VERY BEST TO EVERYONE

MAY GOD HELP US ALL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

it is now over to the circus called clinical exam, now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

yippee !!!! time to enjoy the honeymoon period b4 the reality of the clinicals kicks in and total dementia sets in!

Deepest sympathy to those who didnt make it .This was my third time and i really pray the last.Just remember that this exam is not any measure of how good a doctor u are and remember to be gentle with urself :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats to all those who passed and Good luck for the Clinicals.

For those who did not make it this time, better luck next time. I have gone through it myself and I know the experience but its best put behind you and to move on.

As pointed out by Sandra(above), its by no means a knowledge testing exam. its more like a lottery....Sadly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

congrats to all those who have passed the written .best of luck for clinical prep.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congrats to all who passed.

Best of luck for clinicals. ;)

For folks who haven't - don't worry

You will soon.........! :-*

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear friends

I am getting extremely worked up about the clinical exam. not sure where to start, how and what to do.

no chances of any place on a course.

I am more worried about the long case.

have never tried to present any case in 10mins

so far.

please give me some courage and advice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear dk14

If your main worry is to present a long case in 10 minutes, I'd say 'don't worry'. You can do it.

I remember sitting Part I about 8-9 yrs ago (that's how long I've been away from exams!) and at that time we had to do MCQs and a long case. To me, the long case was the easiest part (even though the case itself wasn't straight forward). Of course, you can argue that was Part I and not Part II.

If you want to practise, I'd say: see lots of patients (not necessarily new admissions, particularly if they're too disturbed. But ask colleagues if they have patients who would be happy for you to interview. You can also choose any out-patient 'follow-ups' that you haven't seen before and book one hour to see them). Then present the case to your consultant/SpR... in 10 minutes. Ask for feedback, and keep practising.

If your main concern is the actual presentation (not the obtaining the information in the first place), you may want to just present any of your patients to colleagues, SpRs...

Go for it! and good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should have said...

Congratulations to all who passed the written part. Best of luck for the long case/PMPs.

And those who didn't pass, don't dispair. It's not nice to be in that position, but use your energy (including anger!) to fight forward. Go for it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear oreta

you cannot imagine how much comfort your post has given me. I have spent all day today trying to tell myself that I can do it. I did the osce pattern for part 1 and so had no exposure to this long case business so far.

thank you very very much for your encouraging words.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear dk14,

I agree with Oreta's good advice and would also add - try to do some observed interviews in 10 minutes as well, as this can be particularly anxiety-provoking. Try to do as many long case practices as you can (I did 5 or 6, it was hard to fit any more into the 3-4 weeks between written results and clinicals) and try to time yourself accurately and fit a physical examination into your 60 minutes with the patient.

Also it might help to draw up some 3x3 aetiology and management 'grids' as well (short/medium/long term, predisposing/precipitating/perpetuating, biological/psychological/social, that kind of thing) for each of the main diagnoses that you could get for a long case. These can be kept quite generalised and are easily adapted and added to for an individual patient. Helps to keep your brain focused when you are running out of time and trying to put your thoughts onto paper.

I think there are quite a few useful suggestions in the 'Part II Clinical' section on this website.

Good luck.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

hello timtam

thanks for your suggestion. I think that is very useful indeed.

do post any more tips as you remember them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have to admit that i am totally paralyzed by fear at the thought of the clinical exam.Its amazing when u think of how many patients u have seen and treated that the long case and pmps seem so frightening.

Of course I have not been helped by the recent comment of one of my old consultants:U are excellent at your job but when put under exam conditions u can give the erroneous impression of knowing a lot less than u do! I mean I think he meant it to help me but its after making my anxiety much greater.I wanted to thank everyone for the tips posted here.I suppose the main thing is practise practise practise !I have been contemplating using b-blockers to help with the over whelming anxiety that is most def at a counterproductive level.Does anyone have any views on this or any other suggestions??? :) :) :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The first thing about pt 2 clinicals is to calm down. Surprisingly the basics are the most important. Think simple. The first thing you do in a normal clinial scenerio. You have been managing patients for ages in clinics, outpatients and on call. Present patients to as many consultants, SpRs and staff grades (post pt 2) as you can.

You will get through it. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked myself up to a high level of anxiety before the clinicals last year and I then had a very helpful comment from a consultant during a PMP session. He told me to imagine I was back in my own hospital, presenting my favourite patient to my favourite consultant after taking a really good history.

Strangely enough this positive thinking worked quite well and on the actual day of the exam I used that same suggestion and stayed relatively calm. I had previously been a bit prone to bursting into tears when under pressure and that had been my big dread, that it would happen during the clinical. But it didn't!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

you are a star Timtam :)I'm going to present a case this evening so I'll try it out.Thank you :lol: :lol:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0