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Medicolegal PMPs - Voting Rights

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A detained inpatient asks you if she has the right to vote in the general election. What will you reply? Would it make any difference if she is a restricted patient (section 41)?

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the detained inpatient certainly has the right to vote, provided she has an address other than the hospital one, as her permanent address.

i am not sure about the sec 41, but they probably can vote by post too.

is it only the prisoners who cant vote now? ??? ???

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There's a great section in the Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry on voting rights for detained patients. It sounds like they are perfectly entitled to vote but can't register their address as the hospital (in case a large hospital upsets things in a small constituency) - even if they've been living there for many years.

The patient must therefore choose a place of residence that they would live in were they not in hospital. The patient needn't actually own the property or indeed tell the people who are living there at present. In addition it doesn't matter if there isn't actually a property there at all as long as the address is valid (eg a building site).

It sounds like the patient could register their address as, say, Buckingham palace and be allowed to vote in that constituency.

Bizarre.

Be seeing you

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There's a great section in the Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry on voting rights for detained patients.  It sounds like they are perfectly entitled to vote but can't register their address as the hospital (in case a large hospital upsets things in a small constituency) - even if they've been living there for many years.

The patient must therefore choose a place of residence that they would live in were they not in hospital.  The patient needn't actually own the property or indeed tell the people who are living there at present.  In addition it doesn't matter if there isn't actually a property there at all as long as the address is valid (eg a building site).

It sounds like the patient could register their address as, say, Buckingham palace and be allowed to vote in that constituency.

Medicolegal PMPs - Voting Rights

Nov 04th 2002 at 21:43:59 A detained inpatient asks you if she has the right to vote in the general election. What will you reply? Would it make any difference if she is a restricted patient (section 41)?

didnt know this till i read the thread, but what abut restriced patient(s41

Bizarre.

Be seeing you

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Voting rights for patients

Informal patients have the right to vote, if they enter on the electoral register their last non-hospital address, or an address where they would be if not in hospital.

Most formal patients can vote, if they are registered, either at the hospital or at a recent home address.

However, those who have been sent to hospital by a criminal court, or transferred from prison, cannot vote.

This is taken from MIND guide.

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Voting rights for patients

Informal patients have the right to vote, if they enter on the electoral register their last non-hospital address, or an address where they would be if not in hospital.

Most formal patients can vote, if they are registered, either at the hospital or at a recent home address.

However, those who have been sent to hospital by [highlight]a criminal court, or transferred from prison[/highlight], cannot vote.

This is taken from MIND guide.

Does it then mean that prisoners cannnot vote

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This section applies to [highlight]unconvicted prisoners, those who are convicted but unsentenced, and to

some civil prisoners.[/highlight]

If you belong to one of these groups, you keep your right to vote.

If your name is not already included on an electoral register and you want to exercise your

right to vote, you can write at any time to an Electoral Registration Officer (ERO) to register

to vote or send a registration form available within the prison. For this form, or for further

information on voting, contact your personal officer (if you have one), another officer, or a

governor.

Prison Service Order 4650 on prisoners’ voting rights is available in the prison library and

contains the addresses of the EROs. It explains the different ways in which prisoners can register

to vote, including new ones brought in by the Representation of the People Act 2000. It also

tells you how to apply for a postal or proxy vote (getting someone else to cast your vote for you).

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