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Gurpal

Part II ISQ Club - Alcohol

39 posts in this topic

20 Part II ISQs on two topics will be posted twice a week. You are encouraged to post a reply in the thread, stating whether you think an ISQ is true or false and why (eg. a short explanation, with reference to the textbook you used). Please only deal with one ISQ in each post and include the question as the first line of your post. All ISQs are taken from previous posts by Forum members.

In a few days this ISQ Club thread will be moved to the Question Bank board. If you submit an answer, your status will be changed to 'Question Bank member' and you will be able to see the Question Bank board. Please allow up to 48 hours for this change to happen.

1. First born sons are more prone to alcohol dependence.

2. Acamprosate is a glutamate antagonist

3. Acamprosate inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase

4. Acamprosate is validated for use in alcohol abuse in old people.

5. In treating dependence, the action stage follows contemplation

6. Disulfiram use is an example of negative reinforcement

7. Regular bingeing more than continuous alcohol use has more effect on the socio-economic situation of the patient

8. Halstead Reitan battery test is used to asses problem drinkers on the medical ward

9. Alcoholic hallucinations resolves spontaneously in 6 months

10. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is of acute onset

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2. Acamprosate is a glutamate antagonist

TRUE

GABA agonist & Glutamate antagonist

(Pg 353, Comp to Psych St, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

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5. In treating dependence, the action stage follows contemplation

FALSE

Follows ready for action

(Pg 351, Comp to Psych St, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

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10. Wernicke’s encephalopathy is of acute onset

TRUE

(Pg 346, Comp to Psych St, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

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3. Acamprosate inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase

FALSE

GABA agonist & Glutamate antagonist

(Pg 353, Comp to Psych St, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

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1. First born sons are more prone to alcohol dependence.

FALSE

Just sons, not related to birth order

(Pg 121, Exam Notes in Psych, Basic Sc, Malhi & Mitchell)

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6. Disulfiram use is an example of negative reinforcement

TRUE

Aversion therapy, form of negative reinforcement

(Pg 915, Synopsis of Psy, 8th Ed, Kaplan & Sadock)

(Pg 2, Rev Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

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8. Halstead-Reitan battery test is used to assess problem drinkers on the medical ward

FALSE

Need screening test e.g CAGE, MAST

(Pg 234, Rev Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

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9. Alcoholic hallucinations resolves spontaneously in 6 months

TRUE

(Pg 79, ICD-10, WHO)

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halsteid reitan battery test used to assess problem drinkers:false

(test for visuo motor tracking,set shifting&of conceptualisation)

pg 217 :cognitive asst for clinicians(hodges)

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7) Regular bingeing more than continous alcohol use has more effect on the socio-economic situation of the patient

True (....I think?)

Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry, 2.17 Alcohol dependence and alcohol problems (via Doctors.net.uk):

An individual who drinks in binges will experience different problems compared with someone who drinks the same amount of alcohol spread over a week or a month or a year. The way in which a person behaves while intoxicated is another important factor determining the nature of alcohol related problems. The social consequences of drinking such as job loss, imprisonment, marital and family break-up, and binge drinking have profound effects on the well being of the drinker, their families and society.

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5. In treating dependence, the action stage follows contemplation

FALSE

Follows ready for action

(Pg 351, Comp to Psych St, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

also see page 564,oxford shorter text book

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6. Disulfiram use is an example of negative reinforcement

I disagree (for once!) with dk2004.

A reinforcer INCREASES the chance of a response. Disulfiram is a deterrent.

The quoted refence talks of aversion therapy (in the first part - the vomiting bit)

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Hi Serab - bit of a confusing concept but think I agree with you. Reinforcement increases the frequency of the desired response (ie. abstinence) by witholding a positive outcome (pleasant effect of drinking alcohol).

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question 6 on disulfiram an example of negative reinforcement is true .ref ;manchester course

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3. Acamprosate inhibits alcohol dehydrogenase.

False. Lowers neuronal excitability by reducing post-synaptic efficacy of excitatory amino acid (EAA) neurotransmitters and possibly by enhancing GABAergic inhibition... thus reducing craving. Kumar and Clark. Clinical Medicine.

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6. Disulphuram and negative reinforcement

False. Reinforcement increases response rate. Negative reinforcement means taking away an adversive stimulus. This is more like punishment.

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I disagree response desired is to stop drinking this behaviour is increased by avoiding unpleasant side effects hence it is negative reinforcement ???

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Re Q6. Sorry to labour the point but isn't the behaviour 'drinking' and the aim of Disulphuram is to decrease the frequency of behaviour by introducing a punishment ( adversive stimulus)? If the behaviour is 'abstinence' then it is only by not doing the behaviour that adversive stimuli are introduced, this isn't quite the same as negative reinforcement is it?

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Dear anthonyc,

'Sorry to labour the point but isn't the behaviour 'drinking' and the aim of Disulphuram is to decrease the frequency of behaviour by introducing a punishment ( adversive stimulus)? '

The same can be viewed as -if the behaviour is drinking & the aim of disulfiram is to decrease the frequency of behaviour: it does that by taking away the positive effect(euphoria/disinhibition)of alcohol(negative reinforcer)!!

dunno...i'm thoroughly confused now!!!!!!!

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Q6 Disulfiram example of negative reinforcer

A6 False

Negative reinforcer: an unpleasant condition is removed and thus increases the likelihood of the response.

It is NOT the same as punishment which is an aversive consequence that supresses a response.

Therefore...is Disulfiram a punishment because it acts after alcohol ingestion??

Any ideas? ???

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Disulfiram is neither punishment nor negative reinforcer

it is Aversive conditioning ::)

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6. Disulfiram use is an example of negative reinforcement

true. That is how i see it:

if you stay abstinent, there will be no nausea, vomiting and headache ( in other words; you reinforce the behaviour of staying sober by removing the unpleasent experience)

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