Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0
Gurpal

Part II ISQ Club - Organic

28 posts in this topic

Part II ISQs on two topics will be posted twice a week. You are encouraged to post a reply in the thread, stating whether you think an ISQ is true or false and why (eg. a short explanation, with reference to the textbook you used). Please only deal with one ISQ in each post and include the question as the first line of your post. All ISQs are taken from previous posts by Forum members.

In a few days this ISQ Club thread will be moved to the Question Bank board. If you submit an answer, your status will be changed to 'Question Bank member' and you will be able to see the Question Bank board. Please allow up to 48 hours for this change to happen.

4 WEEKS LEFT UNTIL THE WRITTEN PAPERS! CLICK HERE FOR THE COUNTDOWN CLOCK!

1. Dementia with myoclonus occurs in CJD

2. Old people with dementia are at significant risk of non-accidental injury by their carer

3. Alzheimer’s disease can be caused by HIV infection

4. A similarity between impaired cognition in old age and Alzheimer’s disease is impaired visuo-spatial scratch pad.

5. Alzheimer’s disease affecting the parietal lobe is associated with a worse prognosis

6. There are specific histological changes to the brain in alcohol dementia

7. Reality-orientation has lasting beneficial effects when used to treat people with dementia

8. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause dementia

9. An abnormal gait is more suggestive of early Alzheimer’s disease than vascular dementia

10. Cognitive impairment is seen in chronic multiple sclerosis

11. Emotional lability is more common in Alzheimer’s disease than Vascular dementia

12. Emotional lability in a patient with dementia indicates vascular dementia rather than Alzheimer’s disease

13. Day hospitals have been proven to be more effective in treating symptoms of dementia than day centres

14. The prolactin level is normal 20 minutes after a pseudoseizure

15. Early onset of apraxia indicates Pick’s disease rather than Alzheimer's

16. Gait disorder suggests vascular dementia than Alzheimer’s disease

17. Death occurs early if parietal lobe is affected in Alzheimer’s disease

18. Non-pharmacological interventions can delay institutional care in Alzheimer's dementia

19. Longstanding multiple sclerosis can cause dementia

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

5. Alzheimer’s disease affecting the parietal lobe is associated with a worse prognosis

TRUE

Other indicators of poor prognosis = “significant language impairment; poor cognitive functioning & reduced density of left parietal region evident on CT scan”

(Pg 410, Revision Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

17. Death occurs early if parietal lobe is affected in Alzheimer’s disease

TRUE

Other indicators of poor prognosis = “significant language impairment; poor cognitive functioning & reduced density of left parietal region evident on CT scan”

(Pg 410, Revision Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. Dementia with myoclonus occurs in CJD

TRUE

(Pg 306, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2. Old people with dementia are at significant risk of non-accidental injury by their carer

TRUE

(Pg 427, Revision Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

6. There are specific histological changes to the brain in alcohol dementia

TRUE

Hemorrhages in 3rd & 4th ventricular gray matter, mamillary bodies, inferior colliculi

(Pg 308, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

9. An abnormal gait is more suggestive of early Alzheimer’s disease than vascular dementia

FALSE

(Pg 299, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

10. Cognitive impairment is seen in chronic multiple sclerosis

TRUE

(Pg 320, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

11. Emotional lability is more common in Alzheimer’s disease than Vascular dementia

FALSE

(Pg 299, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

(Pg 410, Revision Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

12. Emotional lability in a patient with dementia indicates vascular dementia rather than Alzheimer’s disease

TRUE

(Pg 299, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

(Pg 410, Revision Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

16. Gait disorder suggests vascular dementia than Alzheimer’s disease

TRUE

(Pg 299, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3. Alzheimer’s disease can be caused by HIV infection

FALSE

HIV causes a subcortical dementia

Herpes simplex causes Alzheimer’s

(Pg 332 & 369, Synopsis of Psych, Kaplan & Sadock, 8th Ed)

(Pg 409, Revision Notes in Psych, Puri & Hall)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

8. Vitamin B12 deficiency can cause dementia

TRUE

(Pg 329, Synopsis of Psych, Kaplan & Sadock, 8th Ed)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

15. Early onset of apraxia indicates Pick’s disease rather than Alzheimer's

FALSE

(Pg 323, Oxford Txt of Psych, 3rd Ed, Gelder et al)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

19. Longstanding multiple sclerosis can cause dementia

TRUE

(Pg 320, Companion to Psych studies, 6th Ed, Johnstone et al)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

4. A similarity between impaired cognition in old age and Alzheimer’s disease is impaired visuo-spatial scratch pad.

False

Low scores on visual perceptual/spatial tasks often suggest Alzheimers disease or other conditions (eg right hemispheric stroke) that interfere with right parietal lobe functioning (p3028, Kaplan and Sadock, 7th ed)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Prolactin level is normal 20 minutes after a seizure

False

Although the convention wisdom is to take a prolactin level within 20 minutes of an observed seizure, the level would not be returned to normal at the 20 minute mark.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

14. The prolactin level is normal 20 minutes after a pseudoseizure

TRUE

“A prolactin level drawn within 20 minutes of a seizure would be markedly elevated (above 1000) in a generalized tonic clonic seizure, and will be above 500 in a partial complex seizure, but in a pseudoseizure will be within normal limits.”

http://www.vnh.org/FSManual/07/04Seizures.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Amy,

Q 14 refers to a pseudoseizure not a seizure. Therefore the statement  is TRUE

14. The prolactin level is normal 20 minutes after a pseudoseizure

TRUE

“A prolactin level drawn within 20 minutes of a seizure would be markedly elevated (above 1000) in a generalized tonic clonic seizure, and will be above 500 in a partial complex seizure, but in a pseudoseizure will be within normal limits.”

http://www.vnh.org/FSManual/07/04Seizures.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

7 RO has lasting benefits when used to treat patients with dementia.

I think the 'lasting' would make this false

'There is some evidence that RO has benefits on both cognition and behaviour for dementia sufferers. Further research could examine which features of RO are particularly effective. It is unclear how far the benefits of RO extend after the end of treatment, but and it appears that a continued programme may be needed to sustain potential benefits.'--

http://www.cochrane.org/cochrane/revabstr/AB001119.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

reality orientation has lasting benefical effects when used to treat people with dementia t

althouth none of these studdies are particually long the general concensus is that it helps ...

Authors' conclusions: There is some evidence that RO has benefits on both cognition and behaviour for dementia sufferers. Further research could examine which features of RO are particularly effective. It is unclear how far the benefits of RO extend after the end of treatment, but and it appears that a continued programme may be needed to sustain potential benefits

From The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2005. Chichester, UK:

Conclusion: a lower mini mental state examination and the absence of euphoric behaviour in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer's disease may predict a good cognitive outcome of reality orientation therapy.

Age & Ageing. 31(3):193-196, May 2002.

After 20 sessions of formal and complementary activities, a comprehensive improvement of cognition, language,memory and affective functions was observed. Semantic fluency improved with high statistically significant difference. The immediate recall, free or cued, appeared more sensible to stimulation than the delayed one. A correlation between a mini mental state examination (MMSE) low basal score and higher performance after the program was also obtained.

Archives of Gerontology & Geriatrics - Supplement. (9):359-64, 2004.

CONCLUSIONS: Continued ROT classes during the early to middle stages of dementia may delay nursing home placement and slow down the progression of cognitive decline.

Clinical Rehabilitation. 15(5):471-8, 2001 Oct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re Question 7

Thanks for all your imputs and references

But I will suppose the anwser is false if you take into context the 'lasting' benefits of RO in people with dementia ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Q.1 Dementia with myoclonus ossurs in CJD

True page 306 of companion to Psych Studies

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Sign in to follow this  
Followers 0