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RosyWood

Most psychologically advanced language

32 posts in this topic

I just realised in another thread that English- that supposedly superior language- hasn't got a word to describe a mixture of good and bad. I had to use the word 'grey', and ended up feeling terribly racist by the end of the sentence. (It's in the Ugly Face of Scientology thread if you're interested).

Given our amazing resource of first languages on Superego, I was wondering......Does any language have a word for a mixture of good and bad, or 'good-enough', or anything else that describes Klein's depressive position?

PS- Geography is not my specialist subject. Anyone can get me on a blue cheese in trivial pursuit. So, to paraphrase Cilla Black, 'What's your language and where do you come from?' :)

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I think there might not be, certainly I know 3 languages well enough ( :)) to try to answer that, although i am not a scholar in any of them. Given that the concept is of diametrically opposite entities (good and bad, good and evil) there isn't any entity to define where these merge. Only in realistic definitions of theology or morals. So maybe it will be difficult to find such a word. But what a brilliant observation. Don't get carried away though hehe

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Go on, Flakjak- put your money where your mouth is!

What languages, and where from?

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Well Punjabi is my mother tongue and though it is 'derived' from Hindi (my second one :)) it is a distinct language with it's own grammar and syntac. I have studied, spoken and swore in English for 25 years so that probably is the 3rd one in my 'mouth'. ;) I could count Sanskrit as well but don't feel confident enough. Hehe

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indifferent

One entry found for indifferent.

Main Entry: in·dif·fer·ent

Pronunciation: in-'di-f&rnt, -f(&-)r&nt

Function: adjective

Etymology: Middle English, from Anglo-French or Latin; Anglo-French, from Latin indifferent-, indifferens, from in- + different-, differens, present participle of differre to be different -- more at DIFFER

1 : marked by impartiality : UNBIASED

2 a : that does not matter one way or the other b : of no importance or value one way or the other

3 a : marked by no special liking for or dislike of something b : marked by a lack of interest, enthusiasm, or concern for something : APATHETIC

4 : being neither excessive nor inadequate : MODERATE

5 a : being neither good nor bad : MEDIOCRE b : being neither right nor wrong

6 : characterized by lack of active quality : NEUTRAL

7 a : not differentiated b : capable of development in more than one direction; especially : not yet embryologically determined

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OK Evan you've just made me realise I was looking for something that leaned towards the good side of mediocre! Not sure I can tolerate the idea of being an 'indifferent' mother. :-[

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PS Evan- that's quite scarily obsessional............ ;)

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Well there are many words that resemble indifferent, in Hindi and Sanskrit but nothing for 'neither good nor bad'. Certainly no one word for the right side of that scale. ;)

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Actually, I've just thought....Acceptable????? :)

Although, in the thread I was on about, Evan's 'indifferent' would probably have been closer.

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I prefer the english language to my mother tongues, Arabic and Assyrian, so I am always looking out different ways of saying the same word

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Interesting....why do you prefer English? :-?

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I love the way one can say so much with so little in English

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I love the way one can say so much with so little in English

??????

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English is a complicated language and has a wider vocabulary than many other especially european languages because of it's origins. At its root it shares the common indo-european stems and therefore has grammatical similarities with sanskrit. This developed locally into the greek and then the latin tongues, which though the conquests of the Roman Empire got spread through much of western Europe. After the fall in the 4-600s the germanic tribes gradually displaced the pictish and celtic tribes as well as the Britons from mainland britain. The local leaders also through christianisation adopted latin, which was also kept alive by the monasteries. This mish mash developed into Old English.

In the 800s to 1066 the Vikings added addintional words to the language, particularly in the lands held under the Danelaw. Then the Norman invasions of 1066 brought a whole contingent of nobles speaking Old French to the lands, which again was intermingled with the mix of indiginous dialects. Since then English has encorporated words from its overseas colonies including australasian, indian, african and american.

No wonder it is such a diverse and complicated alnguage to learn and use.

Perhaps it can be best illustrated by looking at the words we use to describe someone who knows a lot of things.

Wise comes from the Old English

Clever is from the Germanic

Knowledgeable is from the Latin/Norman.

There's a good book by Bill Bryson called 'Mother Tongue' which explains it much better than I can.

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Definitions of ambivalent on the Web:

uncertain or unable to decide about what course to follow; 'was ambivalent about having children'

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There's a good book by Bill Bryson called 'Mother Tongue' which explains it much better than I can.

Sounds good.....now I have something else to tempt me from part 2! :(

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By the way Ros, how is English the MOST psychologically or as you said in the starting 'supposedly superior' language? Not trying to be confrontational, just enquiring cause I don't think so

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I was wondering what the most psychologically advanced language was- not claiming it was English! :lol: :lol: :lol:

The 'superior' bit related to stuff I've heard amount number of words, vocab, adjectives etc etc in the language- but as far as I know, this is just in comparison to other European languages.

I have no idea about any others and was waiting to be educated ;)

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IMHO , Urdu is a fantastic language and has much more deeply meaningful words, which no other language can even aspire to compare to , BUT .. that's a personal feeling,

BTW , Urdu is not my mother tongue, it's Punjabi

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the closest words that describe something both good and bad are

1.Dualistic

2.Middling

3.Neutral

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Well Punjabi is my mother tongue and though it is 'derived' from Hindi (my second one  :)) it is a distinct language with it's own grammar and syntac. I have studied, spoken and swore in English for 25 years so that probably is the 3rd one in my 'mouth'. ;) I could count Sanskrit as well but don't feel confident enough. Hehe

wow flakjack... your linguistic skills are exactly the same as mine !!!

although i must say you can easily add Urdu to the list coz its verbal form has again got a lot of derivations from hindi/punjabi ...

just picked it up while watching the telly programs that we could intermittently catch on air in punjab :) I cant read it though :(

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I love the way one can say so much with so little in English

So do I! I love the way subtle tones of voice or emphasis on differnet parts of a sentence can change the meaning. Look at this:

'What is this, love?'

'What, is this love?'

'What is this love?'

I love the way drama and film scripts can be written without excessive use of words, and comedy where a little said can convey a lot!

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From Ros

[highlight]Actually, I've just thought....Acceptable?????  

[/highlight]

If you meet anyone from Bombay (or what is now called Mumbai- the industrial capital of India) They will be able to tell you that what is 'goodenough' is

CHALTHA HAIN

Anyone disagree ;)

So that brings me to the conclusion that Bombay Hindi (Bombaiyah)is the most psychologically advanced language..........

Any Munnabhai's out there.!!!!!!!!!!!!Agree???

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Something that is neither good nor bad is surely summed up best by the word:

Meh

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