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Frodo

Neurology and Psychiatry

14 posts in this topic

I have recently attended a joint journal club with neurology/psychiatry. It was really interesting to see how the two disciplines were closely related.

I wanted to see what others thought of more closer liaison between the two. Should psychiatry ST1-3 have the option to do a 6 month rotation as the GP's do in neurology? and vice versa??

I think it could only enrich your practice. I know in South africa you do 6 months compulsary in neurology as part of your rotation.

Is this something we could d/w the powers that be?

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Sheffield has just started this as an ST3 post for the first time. Neurology by day, but psych on-calls. Its a swap with a neurology SHO who does psych by day and neuro on-call.

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In India we used to do 3 months in Neurology and 1 month of Basic Neurosciences during post graduation in Psychiatry.

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My special interest is an LD epilepsy clinic, and it seems hard work

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I worked in LD for over a year. I found Epilepsy really hard. I was using outdated names like Petit mal etc instead of Absences and ended up looking stupid. The generalists dont have much to do with epilepsy but for people interested in LD and old age , neurology job could prove vital as at a consultant level in LD, you have to go thro epilepsy profiles. How do we negotitate this locally, any ideas

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I know something similar but opposite. Physicians, mainly geriatric SpRs are managing to arrange 6-8 weeks of psychiatry attachment at few Trusts and finding it very useful. In most instances, these are arranged by the individual trainee by discussion with his Ed supervisor and the Psych Consultant.

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In egypt psychiatry and neurology as a single speciality called neuropsychiatry and considered a single speciality in training and higher degress.

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I think doing some training in neurology would be very useful for psychiatrists (and psychiatry training for most medics too!).

I find it very difficult learning neurology solely through books.

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I did a few months as SHO on a stroke ward way back when, it was a really useful experience, and you get good at neuro examination. Really when you think about it neurology and psych are the same thing, its just that we haven't identified the structural changes in enough detail for psych illness yet. One day the specialties will merge.

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I did a few months as SHO on a stroke ward way back when, it was a really useful experience, and you get good at neuro examination. Really when you think about it neurology and psych are the same thing, its just that we haven't identified the structural changes in enough detail for psych illness yet. [highlight]One day the specialties will merge.

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hi, i thought the following paper might be of interest in this discussion 8-)

Is shared learning the way to bring UK neurology and psychiatry closer: what teachers, trainers and trainees think

F Schon1, A MacKay2 and C Fernandez3

1 Department of Neurology, Atkinson Morley Wing, St George’s Hospital, London, UK

2 Argyll & Bute Hospital, Lochgilphead, Scotland

3 Mayday University Hospital, Thornton Heath, UK

http://jnnp.bmj.com/cgi/content/full/77/8/943

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Time was 'neurologists' fought to treat what they saw as treatable illnesses of nerves like neur-asthenia in private clinics and gave them rest cures and the like and the 'alienists' / psychiatrists put people in asylums and only later started to give them a bit of malaria or too much insulin. Then neurotic illnesses started to be treated by the specialism of psychiatry and the neurologists were left with diseases caused by things they could see on a scan or at post mortem or at the end of an ophthalmoscope.

I wonder whether, if we could clearly and consistently and easily see a difference in the brains of depressed and non depressed people, for example (scans, at receptor level etc etc) AND knew that difference was the cause of the illness AND could do something about that difference, the depressed patient would go to the Neurologist again.

Or actually (like oceanic says) will it always be that it's a bit of what your brain looks like, a bit of what your upbringing was, a bit of what your outlook on life is, a bit of what happened at work last week, a bit of what friends you've got, a bit of what you smoke or drink or inject etc etc etc.

Having said all that I do get a bit embarrassed having to recite OOh, OOh, OOh, To, Touch etc in front of patients to work out which cranial nerve I'm on so perhaps some time in a Neurology clinic would be helpful.

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Interesting...

Balmu had posted that we had to do 3 months of full time neurology including on calls in neurology when training in India... During which we were also taught interpretation of EEGs, CT and MRI...

In addition, we also had a short case in neurology for the exit exam...

I got a case of traumatic paraplegia....

We also had to interpret EEGs, CTs and MRIs.... My examiner asked me to act out absences... I found the experiece extremely interesting and useful...

After all Freud was a neurlogist before he started taking cocaine :lol:

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