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sony

Mild Frontal Lobe Atrophy

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30 year old male who holds a professional qualification has bilateral mild frontal lobe atrophy.No neurological signs.Has symptoms like apathy, social avoidance and may be decreased working memory.

Is it common to have symptoms if you have mild frontal lobe atrophy?

Is it a risk for dementia?

Anyone who is interested in Neuropsychiatry, Please comment..

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This might be a sign of early dementia. You didnot comment on any vascular changes. 90% of patients with vascular dementia begin with apathy. The frontal atrophy might just be a red herring. Have you thought of asking for an MRI scan?

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Hi Grateful,

This is th MRI scan report of one of my friend who works as a SHO.The scan was done for headaches.

Thanks.

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Sony, that must be horrible for you, but it is only fair to let people here know if your friend is likely to read this (whether in psych or not) because that does change the way we talk about things on this site...mostly we use it as a place where we can let off steam and use our defence mechanisms with impunity... and when the case is something like this, which might apply to us here, they are bound to be called into action.

What strikes me about your friend's case is that symptoms like apathy, social avoidance and possible working memory difficulties are extremely common (when I first read your post, I thought- well- that's my other half you've just described- apart from the age  ;))

Depression, for example , springs to mind (common things occur commonly). The point is, he had the scan for headaches. As far as I know (and correct me if I am wrong, guys, cos God knows I am so far down the list from being SEC's specialist neuropsychiatrist  ;)) headaches cannot be caused by mild frontal lobe atrophy. So effectively what you have is a screening MRI- ie a 'normal' member of the population, who just happens to have had an MRI. As MRIs are not used as a screening tool, we don't know what the frequency of mild frontal atrophy is in the general population, let alone the population of 30 year old professional males. My local academic unit uses medical students as controls, but the numbers are in 10s, rather than 1000s. So we just don't know how common it is (again- correct me if I am wrong, guys).

If you find an 'abnormal' result, you are more likely to go back and look for reasons for it- especially if it is your test, or someone connected to you. We've all done it, I'm sure. But you can't take results from research which has been done for schizophrenia or dementia or whatever and extrapolate it to a young male with headaches.  What your friend might have to deal with is that horrible feeling of just not knowing. And the chances are that he is 'normal'.

That's my take on it- now bring on Dorian, Lena et al  ;)

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sony i think your friend could be suffering from depression

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