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raghubaburaj

Help for an EEG guide

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Hi

Jus wondered if anyone has suggestions for an EEG text. I have one or two which are extremely complicated. I have '' A primer of EEG by Rowan which is ok but could anyone suggest simpler , more visual stuff or any DVD type materials, jus for basics.

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Hi Ohceedee,

I once got this email from BMJ Learning and wondered if this will be of any help to you

[highlight]Dear Colleague,

Can you tell flutter from fibrillation? Or first degree heart block from second? This new interactive case history will show you how. Click on the link to complete it today.

The ECG in patients with chest pain: diagnostic picture tests

http://learning.bmj.com/learning/search-result.html?moduleId=6053275[/highlight]

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Not sure Garuda wanted help with ECG, but yeah, who knows?

He might just find it useful!

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[highlight]Not sure Garuda wanted help with ECG, [/highlight]but yeah, who knows?

He might just find it useful!

Oh dear!!! Iread it as ECG...that proves am dyslecix or burntout in my new job already :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(

Thanks Nocturnal for pointing that out

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[highlight]Not sure Garuda wanted help with ECG, [/highlight]but yeah, who knows?

He might just find it useful!

Oh dear!!! Iread it as ECG...that proves am [highlight]dyslecix[/highlight] or burnt out in my new job already :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'( :'(

Thanks Nocturnal for pointing that out

Didn't really intend to mock at that because many of us feel we need to brush up on our ECG skills.

And misreading EEG does not prove you are dyslexic as much as spelling it by interposing the consonants.

Or was it an intentional error and I failed to pick up the irony? :-/ :-[

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http://www.amazon.co.uk/Fisch-Spehlmanns-EEG-Primer-Principles/dp/0444821481

This book is probably the best book I have read... Its quite detailed... Spehlman... I have a photocopy of the older edition (in India)...

dorain, is there any book that u haven't read? :-/ ;)

Man... In India, as residents, we had to report EEGs... so we were trained to do that... and we had to read this book to do that...

Obviously out of touch for the last 3 years... I dont remember anything now... Talk about getting deskilled :lol: :lol:

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I remember that dorian! Being given a big sheet of EEG by one of my professors and asked to report what the findings are. I remember in the beginning when I was going through the sheets without saying anything the big man asked 'What doc, are you reading a newspaper :lol: :lol:. Learnt it later but as you said in the past 4 years have hardly used it and every thing has gone!!

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I remember that dorian! Being given a big sheet of EEG by one of my professors and asked to report what the findings are. I remember in the beginning when I was going through the sheets without saying anything the big man asked 'What doc, are you reading a newspaper :lol: :lol:. Learnt it later but as you said in the past 4 years have hardly used it and every thing has gone!!

That was funny :lol:

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Who the heck does EEGs nowadays anyway? What would they tell you? Even for epilepsy they aren't great, so how they add to a psych diagnosis I don't know.

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I agree with you Chris. The epilepsy prof in the university often says '' treat the patient, not the EEG'' . There are occasions where it can yield some credence to the diagnosis, esp in absence attacks , as you know . In my case, I am asked basic qs in sp interest sessions with regards to some aspects of interpretation . It is more of an academic exercise rather than a gold digging clinical exploration of epilepsy.

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Who the heck does EEGs nowadays anyway? What would they tell you? Even for epilepsy they aren't great, so how they add to a psych diagnosis I don't know.

As far as clinical diagnostic EEG is concerned...

We were posted in neurology as part of our training... So, we did find it useful in helping or confirming the diagnosis of a number of things... eg: Typical absences, SSPE and JME are a few interesting stuff I can remember... which we diagnosed when we were there...

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[highlight]Who the heck does EEGs nowadays anywa[/highlight]y? What would they tell you? Even for epilepsy they aren't great, so how they add to a psych diagnosis I don't know.

yeah .............no one except da college wants EEG for the paper 2 examination......... duh.............!!!! >:( >:( >:(

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Who the heck does EEGs nowadays anyway? What would they tell you? [highlight]Even for epilepsy they aren't great, so how they add to a psych diagnosis I don't know. [/highlight]

NICE guidelinne for EEG in epilepsy.

An EEG should be

performed only to support a

diagnosis of epilepsy in

adults in whom the clinical

history suggests that the

seizure is likely to be

epileptic in origin. C

1.6.4C An EEG should be performed

only to support a diagnosis

of epilepsy in children. If an

EEG is considered

necessary, it should be

performed after the second

epileptic seizure but may, in

certain circumstances, as

evaluated by the specialist,

f The Guideline Development Group considered that ‘soon’ meant being seen within 4 weeks.

Epilepsy NICE guideline October 2004 15

be considered after a first

epileptic seizure. C

1.6.5 An EEG should not be performed in the case of probable syncope

because of the possibility of a false-positive result. C

1.6.6 The EEG should not be used to exclude a diagnosis of epilepsy in an

individual in whom the clinical presentation supports a diagnosis of a

non-epileptic event. C

1.6.7 The EEG should not be used in isolation to make a diagnosis of

epilepsy. C

1.6.8 An EEG may be used to help determine seizure type and epilepsy

syndrome in individuals in whom epilepsy is suspected. This enables

individuals to be given the correct prognosis. C

1.6.9 In individuals presenting with a first unprovoked seizure, unequivocal

epileptiform activity shown on EEG can be used to assess the risk of

seizure recurrence. B

1.6.10 For individuals in whom epilepsy is suspected, but who present

diagnostic difficulties, specialist investigations should be

available. GPP

1.6.11 Repeated standard EEGs may be helpful when the diagnosis of the

epilepsy or the syndrome is unclear. However, if the diagnosis has

been established, repeat EEGs are not likely to be helpful. C

1.6.12 Repeated standard EEGs should not be used in preference to sleep or

sleep-deprived EEGs. C

1.6.13 When a standard EEG has not contributed to diagnosis or

classification, a sleep EEG should be performed. C

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