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Afterlife

Questions about spirituality and moral values

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Questions about spirituality.

What would be the questions about spirtiuality if someone wants to ask in context of premorbid personality in a non-judgemental and neutral way, starting with open-ended questions.

What do you normally do to get peace of mind? Do  you engage yourself in any exercise, yoga, prayer,  meditation, listening to music etc?

What are your views about spirituality?

What about religion?

How important is religion in your life?

Do you practice it in any way?

How important is God in your life?

Do you seek help from God in any way?

Do you do anything to please God?

What do you do?

What are the good moral values and virtues  that a person should have?

What are the bad things which a person should not do?

What are the bad  things in your  society or in the world that annoy you the most?

Furthermore also read the  HOPE Questionnaire:

http://www.aafp.org/afp/20010101/81.html

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Those are good questions to ask.

I think we often omit to ask questions along those lines. However, they can be useful to help understand the px's support systems, and help differentiate btw what is usual practice for them and what is taking on a new, possibly psychotic quality.

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Wonder whether we need so many questions to be asked about spirituality?

To know the support system maybe we could ask for their religios and whether they get any support through them. Otherwise unless the have religious delusions is there any point. ;)

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We should acknowledge peoples religious and spiritual beliefs and ask them about it on admission. Our patients are more religious than us on the whole (although I am not sure how that has shifted in recent years with many more trainees coming from an Islamic background). Even though we may not see it as important, it is essential that people have the chance to speak to a chaplain, or their own priest, imam, rabbi, wicka practitioner, etc.

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We should acknowledge peoples religious and spiritual beliefs and ask them about it on admission. Our patients are more religious than us on the whole (although I am not sure how that has shifted in recent years with many more trainees coming from an Islamic background). Even though we may not see it as important, it is essential that people have the chance to speak to a chaplain, or their own priest, imam, rabbi, wicka practitioner, etc.

Crhris sprirituality and religion are perceived differently in most of the East, not only in islamic trainees. And not all islamic trainees are religous.

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Flak:  I know.

I'm not wanting this thread to turn into a 'red hot' one! ;)

All I mean is that the demographic changes in trainees (for example only 6% of exam candidates in one diet this year were originally from the UK) are more likely to have led to changes in the proportion of trainees with religious and spiritual beliefs.

It is my conjecture (but I admit I don't have any data to corroborate it) that on avereage UK trainees are less likely to be spiritual/religious than non-UK trainees. So more non-UK trainees = a mean increase in those reporting religious and spiritual beliefs overall.

That is all.  8-)

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Flak:  I know.

I'm not wanting this thread to turn into a 'red hot' one! ;)

All I mean is that the demographic changes in trainees (for example only 6% of exam candidates in one diet this year were originally from the UK) are more likely to have led to changes in the proportion of trainees with religious and spiritual beliefs.

It is my conjecture (but I admit I don't have any data to corroborate it) that on avereage UK trainees are less likely to be spiritual/religious than non-UK trainees. So more non-UK trainees = a mean increase in those reporting religious and spiritual beliefs overall.

That is all.  8-)

More diplomatically correct language ;)

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I agree with euthymic and feel there is no need at all for so many questions on spirituality. A simple 'Are you religious and what does that mean for you?'  should be perfectly sufficent unless you feel that the patient may have religious delusions.

I think it is totally inappropriate to ask a person  'What are the good moral values and virtues  that a person should have?

What are the bad things which a person should not do?'

I would be quite offended if a doctor asked me that, I don't feel it's relevant at all.

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completely agree with britney i will perceive such questions as too intrusive.

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Thanks for the links, but you might want to google the authors name before you believe everything written in those articles....its very interesting. ;)

The man is entitled to his own opinions and belief's but i do not think they are repersentative of the opinions and belief's of most people in society.

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that thought did pass my mind britney as the authors are part of the spiritality special interest group.still good to see a different view point.

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